CELESTE

About The Images

CELESTE is the flagship genre of the Astraveo product line. Featuring some the most visually stunning celestial objects in the known Universe, professionally imaged on the world's most advanced optical telescopes, CELESTE offers one of the most unique and authentic ways to capture the breathtaking majesty of the cosmos on a human scale.

"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder." And yet, too often astrophysical images are corrupted, their colors changed to make them more striking or attention-grabbing. Too often, the beautiful reality of an image--the awe that comes with knowing that this is how that thing looks--is sacrificed forever in the effort to make the flashiest image possible. CELESTE is a shift away from this--and a step in the right direction. Our astronomers pour hundreds of person-hours into ensuring the image as it looks on your wall is as close to reality as is physically possible. 

Every step of the process is painstakingly and carefully conducted to ensure the integrity of the final result. The most sensitive telescopes in the world, on the highest, coldest peaks, super-resolve the source in three separate filters. Each image is individually processed and the colors and light curves of visible objects are compared to known distances and luminosities to ensure accurate color reproduction. Our astronomers work with leading canvas manufacturing experts to optimize the process of printing the vibrancy and range captured in the images. High-quality fabrics and premium inks are used to ensure no corners are cut in the finished product. Mounted on strong, durable wood, all canvases are carefully prepared to eliminate degradation from light and exposure to fingerprints. 

Thanks to the seamless integration of cutting-edge astrophysical imaging techniques with the most advanced canvas printing technology commercially available, we've been able to truly capture the scale of these celestial objects with our custom-made six-foot-long canvases. No longer will you just take in the majesty of nebula, globular clusters, and galaxies--now, you can lose yourself in them, in the ultimate form of wall-art immersion. 

Meet the Images

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Orion

This image of a star field about 1200 light-years distant is a zoom-in of the Orion molecular cloud complex -- which as one looks at the Orion constellation in the sky, is located in the south-east region of the jewel in his sword. At about 10-million years old, this stellar nursery is an extremely active and ongoing site of star formation. The redder colours in the image represent hydrogen gas, which is very abundant in star forming regions, whereas the brown wispy regions represent dustier areas with emission from hydrogen and oxygen gas-rich areas. This composite image was created from a multi-filter set of U, B, V (on the Johnson system), R and I (on the Kron-Cousins system) filter exposures in the summer of 2004. With exposure times of 500, 300, 300, 250 and 360 seconds in the UBVRI filters, respectively, we used the 0.9-meter telescope* at the Cerro Tololo InterAmerican Observatory -- located about 30-miles south-east of La Serena, Chile -- to acquire the images.

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30 Doradus

In the Dorado constellation, one can find this massive nebulous region lying about 160,000 light-years distant in the Large Magellanic Cloud.  30 Doradus is more commonly known as the Tarantula Nebula. It is a vast complex of dust lanes, interstellar gas, and clusters of ongoing star formation, with gigantic reservoirs of ionized hydrogen gas. The image shows that many sites of very active star formation in the nebula are illuminating extensive gas and dust lane structures across more than 300-400 light-years in diameter. We created this composite image from a multi-filter set of U, B, V, R & I exposures in the spring of 2005. With exposure times of 350, 150, 100, 75 and 60 seconds in the UBVRI filters, respectively, we used the 1.0-meter telescope* at the Cerro Tololo InterAmerican Observatory to acquire the image.

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NGC 3576

Lying at some 9000 light-years distant in the Carina nebula, this enormous nebula, also known as the Statue of Liberty Nebula, is an extensive network of dust and gas and active, ongoing star formation. NGC 3576 is very similar in nature to the gigantic 30 Doradus nebula albeit about 3 times smaller in spatial extent. We created this composite image from a multi-filter set of U, B, V, R & I filter exposures in the summer of 2011. With exposure times of 600, 400, 300, 250 and 250 seconds in the UBVRI filters, respectively, we used the 1.0-meter telescope* at the Cerro Tololo InterAmerican Observatory to acquire the images.

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NGC 1365

In the Fornax constellation, there is a deep-sky, double-barred spiral galaxy called NGC 1365 -- where NGC stands for New General Catalogue -- which lies about 56 million light-years distant, and is also known as the Great Barred Spiral Galaxy. The galaxy is one of the most prominent members of the Fornax galaxy cluster. At about 200,000 light-years across, it may be as much as 50% larger than the Milky Way, and probably has a supermassive black hole at its center. Our composite image of NGC 1365 was created from a multi-filter set of U, B, V, R & I exposures in the spring of 2005. With exposure times of 600, 500, 375, 300 and 250 seconds in the UBVRI filters, respectively, we used the 1.0-meter telescope* at the Cerro Tololo InterAmerican Observatory to acquire the images.

...and more!

* = These telescopes are operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) and NSF’s National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation (NSF).